CONTACT

If you are interested in in finding out more about what we do at the MPCA or would like to get involved please complete the form below.

DONATIONS

If you wish to support us or fund new projects, please contact us via e-mail: mpca2008@gmail.com

We greatly appreciate all and any support. Thank You.

Midlands Polish Community Association Workshops, Seminars & Training Days

TRAINING ON THE USE OF PHOTO STORY 3 CARRIED OUT BY MAUREEN SMOJKIS AT CARRS LANE

22 May 2015

  

Photo by Ilona Zielinska/Marcin Sz Photography

 

INTERVIEWERS DELIVERING THEIR CD-s WITH RECORDED INTERVIEWS, TRANSCRIPTIONS AND PHOTOGRAPHS

14 March 2015

MPCA MEMBERS ON THEIR WAY TO THE EURO-PRINT COMPANY IN LEICESTER

04 March 2015

  . 

MPCA MEETING AT CARRS LANE

19 February 2015

Mrs Grazyna Golowczynska presented her interviews, transcriptions and summaries-done fast and accurately.

  •  

  •  

PRESENTATION AND WORKSHOP. DR ALEKSANDRA GRZYMAŁA-KAZŁOWSKA: MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION THEORIES; CASE STUDIES OF THE ADAPTATION STRATEGIES OF VIETNAMESE AND UKRAINIAN MIGRANTS IN POLAND

29 January 2015

        

Dr Aleksandra Grzymała-Kazłowska  presented her research on adaptation strategies of Vietnamese and Ukrainian immigrants having permit for settlement in Poland who live in Warsaw and its vicinity (namely in the Mazowieckie province), with an emphasis on the relationship between the cultural, social and economic dimensions of adaptation. The main part of the study was a survey conducted from February to October 2005 by the Centre of Migration Research (CMR) at the University of Warsaw with representative samples of 169 Vietnamese and 162 Ukrainian citizens possessing permits for settlement in Poland. In addition semi-structured, individual, in-depth interviews were carried out in the years 2006–2010 with selected 21 Vietnamese and 21 Ukrainian migrants settled in Poland stratified by gender, type of marriage (homogeneous or heterogeneous) and the age at which migrants’ acculturation began, enriched by numerous informal interviews and field observations among both migrant populations.

Dr Aleksandra Grzymała-Kazłowska also distributed her paper titled “The role of different forms of bridging capital for immigrant adaptation and upward mobility. The case of Ukrainian and Vietnamese immigrants settled in Poland” among participants.

In the second part of the Workshop Dr Grzymała-Kazłowska  showed a 45 minutes documentary film about Vietnamese immigrants in Poland. Historically, the migration began in the 1950’s when a pact between Poland and Vietnam, both communist nations, led to the relocation of students, scholars, engineers and other people of skill. This link was already secured when communist Poland collapsed. The Vietnamese newcomers were presented as quite well organised, hardworking and educated community.

An important part of the workshop was discussion focused on adaptation strategies of Vietnamese and Ukrainian migrants.

 

Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska is a Marie Curie Fellow based within the Institute for Research into Superdiversity. Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska is a visiting Marie Curie Fellow based within the Institute for Research into Superdiversity. She also holds a position as an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Sociology and a Senior Researcher at the Centre of Migration Research. Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska specialises in the issues of adaptation and integration of immigrants, cultural representations and ethnic attitudes as well as new theories of migration and integration. She is an author, editor or co-editor of 6 books or special issues of academic journals as well as over 40 academic papers published, among others, in 'Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies', 'Ethnicities', 'Canadian Diversity' and 'Journal of Migration and Refugee Studies'. She is a member of the Research Committee on Human Migrations and Polish Diaspora at the Polish Academy of Science and serves as an expert at the Human Rights Defender and a Deputy Editor for the journal 'Central and Eastern European Migration Review'.

ORAL HISTORY TRAINING (Part 2)

26 November 2014

  

 

An Oral History Training session (Part 2) with Izzy Mohammed, Audience Engagement  Coordinator, was held at the Library of Birmingham. The MPCA members and volunteers presented their first recorded interviews. The strong and weak points of the interviews were discussed and where necessary, it was pointed out where there was room for a possible improvement.

ARCHIVES SKILLS TRAINING

26 November 2014

   

Birmingham Libraries and Archives’ senior archivist Mrs Rachel MacGregor, provided important support around archives skills training. She informed the MPCA members and volunteers how their collections, comprising oral histories, photographs, documents and letters can be organised and made accessible once the project is completed. This enjoyable training included an introduction to archives, support around cataloguing and listing and accessioning.

 

CONNECTING HISTORIES: VOICES PAST AND PRESENT.

15 November 2014

Connecting Histories: Voices Past and Present. The Community Heritage Open Day at the Library of Birmingham coincided with the Library’s Voices Season. It was a great opportunity to discuss the heritage and history of the city and meet experience practitioners  on oral history and related heritage. A number of community groups spoke about various aspects of the city’s heritage/history, about their projects and possible opportunities for future partnerships. The MPCA Project “Collected Memories of Birmingham’s Poles” (supported by Heritage Lottery Fund) was presented by Mrs Maureen Smojkis. 

BASIC SKILLS TTRAINIG ON USING RECORDING TECHNIQUES

11 November 2014

   

Basic skills training on using recording techniques was provided by the Project Manager and the experienced Interviewer at Carrs Lane Conference Centre.

SOCIAL ANCHORING AND SETTLEMENT: ADAPTATION AND INTEGRATION IN BIRMINGHAM'S NEW POLISH COMMUNITY

06 November 2014

    

The MPCA team and volunteers attended a Workshop titled ‘Social Anchoring and Settlement: adaptation and integration in Birmingham's new Polish community’, run by Dr Aleksandra Kazlowska (Uniersity of Warsaw). The event was held at the Heritage Learning Centre, Library of Birmingham and was a part of the ESRC Social Sciences Festival 2014.

The workshop brought evidence from in-depth research on the settlement of Polish migrants in the UK and outlined the potential applications of a new way of thinking about “social anchoring” in helping to both support adaptation and integration practice and shape research on this topic. Following a presentation, attendees had an opportunity to listen to and discuss the experiences of practitioners working with Polish migrants. Then participants were invited to identify their anchors as well as to join group discussions in which they explored the role of different anchors in adaptation and integration while thinking about the practical applications of anchoring.
The workshop represented an opportunity for the public and practitioners to get involved in an accessible way in research and to understand how such activities can be used to shape practice. It is relevant to the experiences of residents/policymakers/practitioners in Birmingham as rapid change leads to superdiversification and a range of challenges for our society.

ORAL HISTORY TRAINING (part 1)

02 November 2014

 

MPCA members and volunteers attended an Oral History Training session (Part 1) with Izzy Mohammed (Audience Engagement  Coordinator), held at the Library of Birmingham. During the session many topics were discussed. First of all the meanings of History and Heritage were clarified and their significance made clear for the “Fitting In and Getting Along. Integration and Identity for Birmingham’s British Poles” project. It was pointed out that oral histories are those personal stories, memories experiences and feelings not presented in official documents and which if not captured would otherwise be lost. So, it is necessary to extract them in order to preserve them for the future in Birmingham’s archives.

The participants listened to several examples from previous oral history projects, including recorded stories relating to corner shops and the feelings, memories and experiences of those involved. Izzy Mohammed gave advice on carrying out interviews and stated that they should be conducted in such a fashion as to be more of a monologue prompted and steered  by the interviewer. However, it would be a good idea to prepare some questions to ask in the event of a more reluctant interviewee and to give structure to the interview. At the end of the session members of the MPCA conducted interviews on their colleagues to familiarise themselves both with this task as well as to familiarise themselves with the recording equipment.

The Oral History training was very informative and all the participants were inspired by Izzy’s enthusiasm for capturing the oral histories of Birmingham’s communities.